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Skip Navigation LinksNorthampton County Website COUNTY GUIDE Historical Sites That Recall Our Traditions

Skip Navigation LinksCTYHistoricalSites Historical Sites That Recall Our Traditions

​Burnside Plantation, Bethlehem, PA

In 1748, Moravian missionary James Burnside and his wife, Mary, built the first single-family house in Bethlehem on 500 acres adjacent to the Moravian settlement. It was a move of historic proportions since all other Moravians of that period lived communally in houses especially built for single men, single women and married people. Today, seven acres of that original farm are reproduced as a living history museum.


A Moravian Tour Guide

Moravian Historical Society, Nazareth, PA 18064

One of the oldest historical societies in Pennsylvania, the Moravian Historical Society was established in 1857 to preserve the history and heritage of the Moravian Church.

Claussville One Room Schoolhouse, Claussville, PA

This charming 1893 one-room school was the county's last one-room school, when it closed long ago, but it remains ready for the next class, with all its contents intact.
Colonial Moravian Industries of the Colonial Industrial Quarter and the home of John

Jacob Nicholas House, Easton, PA 18042

History buffs can enjoy artifacts and documents of the county in this home that has been converted into a local history museum.

Jacobsburg Historical Society, Nazareth, PA. 18064

The Boulton Visitors' Center is open all year, Monday through Friday from 9:00 am to 4:00 pm and is located at 441 Henry Road, just off the Belfast Exit of PA 33 in Bushkill Township, Northampton County.


Northampton County Historical and Genealogical Society, Easton, PA 18042

Northampton County’s own heritage can be explored in this wonderful museum through its outstanding collection of items, including everyday objects, books, documents and memorabilia.


The Waterworks in Candlelight

Sebastian Goundie, master brewer, Bethlehem, PA

In 1741, members of the Unitas Fratrum, a Protestant denomination more commonly known as the Moravian Church, immigrated to the New World to bring the Gospel to Native Americans. Operating under a communal plan called the "General Economy,” these early Moravians founded Bethlehem and quickly developed a unique complex of trades, crafts and industries. This site now contains the 1761 Tannery, the 1762 Waterworks (oldest pumped waterworks in America), and the 1869 Luckenbach Mill with the HistoryWorks!, a children's interactive gallery located on the first floor. The Federal-style 1810 Goundie House was Bethlehem's first brick residence and the only present-day house museum in the historic district.

Troxell-Steckel House and Farm Museum, Egypt, PA

The region's only authentically complete Pennsylvania-German farmhouse, built in 1756, resembles its medieval ancestors and gives a captivating glimpse of the area's farm history.

The Slate Belt Heritage Center, Bangor, PA 18013

Built in 1905, the Slate Belt Heritage Center originally served as the town hall, council chambers, borough offices, and fire department for the town of Bangor. In 1998, a group of determined citizens decided to save the deteriorating building and use it to house local heritage. Many volunteers enthusiastically began the arduous task of refurbishing the center from its hardwood floors to the tower housing the old clock. One of the highlights is a mural painted by art students from Bangor High School, depicting Bangor’s history to the end of the 20th century. The Slate Belt Heritage Center opened its doors to the public in 2000. The center contains two floors of self-guided exhibits that serve as a tribute to the early Slate Belt settlers and their unique blend of ethnic cultures.

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